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Fenton Water Sets / Tumblers - Part 1
FENTON WATER SETS / TUMBLERS - Part 1
 
SILVER BAND - SILVER QUEEN - photos Courtesy Bob Smith.
SILVER BAND - SILVER QUEEN - photos Courtesy Bob Smith.

SILVER BAND - SILVER QUEEN:  Silver enameling is unique to these two tumblers, according to information from Bob Smith, longtime tumbler collector from MA. He further states that neither one may win a beauty prize, but they are uncontested rarities. They rank right up there with the most difficult of tumblers to locate.
The characteristics of the basic tumbler lead us to Fenton as the manufacturer. The pattern could not be simpler for SILVER BAND. The band around the center of the glass is 5/16” wide, with a more  narrow band on either side of that.
The SILVER QUEEN has a 5/8” band just below the rim and attached to it are five fancy scroll-like designs completely encompassing the tumbler. Marigold iridescence is strong on both these tumblers. A bulbous-type pitcher such as are typical of Fenton production, and nearly identical to the Cannonball shape is known in the Silver Queen pattern. It sold for $25 in a 1994 auction. A more tankard-type pitcher is reported to have similar silver bands of design.
Both tumblers share 10 wide panels on their interiors. Bases of both tumblers are plain. Both tumblers have a 3” rim and a 2 ¼” base, whereas the height of the Silver Band is 3 15/16”. The Silver Queen is 3 13/16”.
Bob Smith feels that luck is with the collector who finds either of these tumblers.
Note: Our second photo of a SILVER QUEEN displays vestiges of former silver paint across the prisms in the tumbler, and there is slight variation in the scroll painting. Individually applied enameling accounts for this. No painter can precisely duplicate another painter's design.
 
Bulbous portion of marigold SILVER QUEEN Pitcher showing well-worn silver scroll painting under the broad silver band.
SILVER QUEEN
Bulbous portion of marigold SILVER QUEEN Pitcher showing well-worn silver scroll painting under the broad silver band.
SILVER QUEEN

SILVER QUEEN cutaway view of the bulbous pitcher: This close-up of the pitcher base displays well-worn former silver scrollwork under that large silver band.
 
DOTTED DIAMONDS and DAISIES.From the Don Kime collection - Photo Courtesy Jerry Kudlac.
DOTTED DIAMONDS and DAISIES
From the Don Kime collection - Photo Courtesy Jerry Kudlac

DOTTED DIAMONDS and DAISIES Tumbler: Jerry Kudlac made an index of tumblers in Don Kime's collection. In asking Bob Smith to identify some of them, this unusual example came to light. Kindness granted by those involved provides a close look at this painted design, which should help heighten attention to it, should any of you locate another. There is a pitcher painted with the same design.
 
STARFLOWER Pitcher in Marigold
STARFLOWER Pitcher in Marigold

STARFLOWER Pitcher: in marigold is quite scarce. A rare white is known. This is not to say that the blue examples in pitcher form are much more plentiful. This is one of the most evasive patterns produced by Fenton! No matching tumblers in any color have ever surfaced. (You may view a lovely blue example by clicking on - S - in our Alphabet pattern index on the home page.
 
BOUQUET and ORANGE TREE SCROLL-July 1914 Butler Bros. ad.
BOUQUET and ORANGE TREE SCROLL-July 1914 Butler Bros. ad.
 
ORANGE TREE SCROLL in Blue - 11.5 in. tall.
ORANGE TREE SCROLL
ORANGE TREE SCROLL in Blue - 11.5 inches tall.
ORANGE TREE SCROLL in Marigold

ORANGE TREE SCROLL: A very scarce water set, indeed. Marigold is the more difficult to locate. Blue pitchers/tumblers seldom surface. While Fenton produced a great many water sets in various patterns, many of them are in extremely short supply.
 
BOUQUET in Blue
BOUQUET in Marigold
BOUQUET in Blue
BOUQUET in Marigold

BOUQUET:  Similarly bulbous in shape to the Cannonball. (Estimated production period of around 1914.) The crimped top is typical of this floral, all-over pattern. The flowers are similar to daisies. (The single-known Persian Blue tumbler in this pattern can be located for viewing by clicking on - B - in our pattern index). Blue and marigold are the standard colors for this water set.
 
very rare to find a DIAGONAL BAND tankard without enameling
Enameled IRIS or BANDED DRAPE Water Set. This set sold for $400 at the mid April 2005 Seeck Auction for HOACGA.
Very rare to find a DIAGONAL BAND tankard without enameling.
Enameled IRIS or BANDED DRAPE Water Set. This set sold for $400 at the mid April 2005 Seeck Auction for HOACGA.

DIAGONAL BAND: is the basic mold shape of this tankard having no painted design.  These were produced in marigold, blue, amethyst and a scarce green. The example shown here is amethyst and quite handsomely iridized to say the least!

BANDED DRAPE: is the name given this pattern when discussed on page 38 of the FIRST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF FENTON by Heacock. He calls it a lemonade pitcher with Iris decoration, showing an example in blue. When these are listed in a carnival glass auction brochure, they are usually referred to as IRIS water set. The shape of the tankard is “elegant” and these are quite desirable, bringing handsome prices in any of the four colors, marigold, blue, amethyst and green.

Dean & Diane Fry - 4-06

Pray for one another.-------James 5:16

Prayer is a conversation with God, not a formula. However, five-finger prayers might be used as a “method” to freshen up our prayer time.

When you fold your hands, the thumb is nearest you. Begin by praying for those closest to you-your loved ones (Philippians1:3-5).
The index finger is the pointer. Pray for those who teach-(1Thessalonians 5:25).
The next finger is the tallest. It should remind you to pray for those in authority over you---national and local leaders (1 Timothy   2:1-2).
The fourth finger, usually the weakest should be used to pray for those who are in trouble or who are suffering (James 5:13-16).
Then comes your little finger, reminding you of your smallness in relation to the greatness of God. Ask Him to supply your needs (Phillippians 4:6,19).

Our prayers ascend to God's throne in heaven, regardless of the “method” we use. The condition of our heart during the time of prayer, matters more than the words we pray.





Should you care to contact the Frys, their email address is:




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